23 comments

  1. PTSD is scary. The relationship of my partner and i is still stressed until now. he is not a soldier but he is a veteran biker who had an accident last feb 14 (See: http://ridergirlmanila.wordpress.com/2013/02/23/mending/ )

    when someone feels useless in spite of the fact that there are people surrounding him that could be enough reason for him to be back to his own self – that is scary.

    my partner was almost back. but there are also people who unknowingly hold him back by cutting into his building self esteem.

    PTSD is not only hard for those who undergo it. It is also hard for the people fighting for hope for the person with PTSD.

    Kudos to your blogsite, it is wonderful. And thanks also for following my blogsite.

  2. Thanks for posting this link and for following my page. I have several friends that suffer from PTSD. It is always nice to see someone acknowledge that their internal battles are real and continue even after external ones end. You have some pretty interesting topics on your site and I look forward to reading more of them.

  3. Thanks for posting this. I am also a 23 year military veteran of declared and undeclared war, and all the sequalea that follow. I don’t have the words nor the energy to face my inner demonds and articulate the hell – but it’s good to know that I’m not alone here.

  4. Thanks for posting about our soldiers deep and well deserved concerns and pain. I contributed to an article where we were asked how cities can serve our soldiers a bit better. Here is the article if you want to read it. Debra Ann PTSD suicide more deadly to American Soldiers than…http://guardianlv.com/2013/01/ptsd-suicide-more-deadly-to-american-soldiers-than-combat/

  5. Hi and thanks for following my new site. Please consider the interest returned as I have had a good wander round your own blog and found it very interesting so am now following you too. Look forward to reading more of your posts.

  6. I am reading a relevant book and for once can see the soldiers world
    in a closer perspective. i believe all soldiers returning from a battle field
    should be made available psychiatric treatment for rehabilitation
    preferably by someone who has also served and has first hand experience.
    If the army can spend bucketloads of money in artillery and war
    then both army and country should spend enough for its soldiers
    once they have served and returned traumatised so they can get
    some life back.
    War is the worst curse of Humanity.
    I have raved enough… but i was touched by this entry…

      • Thank you for your kind words!
        I am taking the opportunity of reply to add the relevant information about the book i mention in my previous reply as it may be of interest to many of your followers/visitors.

        Title: A Pogo’s Perspective by Greg Smith -pub 2007

        A non combatant soldier’s Viet Nam experience;
        its affect and aftermath.

        He describes nicely his experience and how they affected his life thereafter. I thought it as a book for Boys one my husband would enjoy, not a laddie’s one
        but was surprised how deep it touched me and how it made me see things from a different perspective
        and your entry was just another confirmation.
        Years back i had associated for a short term with a Viet Nam soldier who displayed problems that confused me.
        People were telling my husband that i should stop communicating with him because he was ‘screwed’ and might affect me badly. Of course i did not as he was very intelligent and interesting to talk to despite the ‘here and there’ unexplained to me weirdness of some parts of expression. This recent book made me look back and understand better that good poor soul been avoided by the ‘normal’ but inconsiderate ignorant ones.
        Apologies again for the length of my reply – rarely comment in blogs i visit but i do believe there may be many interested people out there and i noticed many others were touched and responded to your entry as well.

  7. Wow, “I Don’t Feel Good” is powerful! Thanks for bringing it to my attention. And thanks for liking my story, “The Old, Old Story, Part 1.” I hope to read more of your writing, soon.

    Thom

  8. That is quite a letter, and it makes sense that he’s been holding back the tears for that many years when that’s all he has to say: – ] Anyway, thanks for stopping by my blog and following along on my journey into the unknown of publishing.

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